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1.0  Name of the Programme: PGD Criminology and Security Studies

Programme Code:    2301

 

2.0       Entry Requirements

To be admitted for the PGD Criminology and Security Studies, a candidate is expected to:

  1. Be a graduate from a recognized university with a minimum of a pass degree

 

             ii.         Possess qualifications adjudged to be equivalent to a first degree;

            

  1. Hold the HND with a minimum of lower credit from a recognized institution.

 

3.0       Philosophy, Aims and Objectives

 

 

3.1 Philosophy

The PGD in Criminology and Security Studies offer students an opportunity for advanced critical work in areas such as the social construction of crime, criminology and punishment; socio- legal studies; and equality; and governance and regulation. The program provides students with the analytical and research skills necessary for further graduate study; research or teaching; policy research and practice; employment in government/ non- government agencies, especially public and the private security sector.

 

3.2 Vision

To provide functional, cost-effective, flexible learning which adds life- long value to quality of education for all who seek Knowledge. There are in line with National Policy on education and within the  National Open University of Nigeria

 

The PGD Criminology and Security Studies programme has been developed to assist students in identifying the causes of crime and methods of controlling and preventing it. It also aims at building on their research expertise in such areas as security, policing, prisons, media, probation, and community safety, with a view to contributing to crime prevention and control policy development in the society. 

 

            

3.3       Aims

           

The PGD Criminology and Security Studies Programme aims at giving postgraduate students the opportunity to combine the intellectual adventure of contemplating some fundamental questions of order and control in contemporary societies with a strong sense of relevance to practical affairs. It  therefore provides graduates with a sound basis from which to pursue a wide range of careers in security, criminal justice and a range of “transferable skills” that are highly valued in today’s labour market.

 

3.4       Objectives

The programme essentially is designed to help graduates:

 

  1. understand  the key conceptual and substantive issues involved in the study of crime and security;

 

  1. acquire “transferable skills” and methods of criminological and security research geared towards crime prevention and control policy design and implementation;

 

  1. to be equipped to pursue in-depth studies of particular topics of theoretical and practical interest in crime and security;

 

  1. think on their own and advise government to take effective policy decisions on contemporary issues in criminology and security affecting the society. 

 

4. Programme Structure and Degree Rules

 

     4.1 Programme Structure:

     The PGD criminology and security studies programme is structured in 2 semesters as shown        below:

 

 

S/N

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

1st Semester

2.

CSS753

Research Methods in Criminology

3

C

3.

CSS755

Patterns and Trends of Crime in Nigeria

3

C

4.

CSS757

Contemporary Issues in Criminology and Security Studies

3

C

5.

CSS791

Emergency, Riot and Disaster Control Management

3

E

6.

CSS743

Principles of Security Practice and Management

3

C

8

CSS745

Types and  Analysis of Security Threats

3

C

9.

CIT 753

Introduction to the Internet

2

C

10.

GST707

Good Study Guide

2

C

11.

CIT701

Computer Fundamentals

2

C

 

 

Total Credit Units

30

 

2nd Semester

1.

CSS742

Policing and Law Enforcement in Nigeria

3

C

2.

CSS772

Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria

3

C

3.

CSS774

Prisons and Correctional Institutions in Nigeria

3

E

4.

CSS732

Project

6

C

5.

CSS744

Security Planning, Development, and Organisation

3

C

6.

CSS746

Legal and Social Framework of Private Security in Nigeria

3

C

7.

CSS747

Technical/Electronics Aspects of Security.

3

C

8.

CSS 791

Emergency, Riot and Disaster Control Management

3

E

 

 

Total Credit Units

27

 

Students must pass all CSS, GST and CIT courses and two elective courses. 

 

 

 

 

 

4.2       Degree Rules. To graduate with a PGD in Criminology and Security Studies, the students must have minimum of 35 credit units of Core courses and 2 units of Elective courses.

 

5.0     Course Development

 

The syllabus (syllabi) for all the courses are as described in the course description for all the courses on offer. All the courses are developed based on the resources found in Nigeria. Course Material writers are sourced from the crop of the specialists in the various tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The course materials are also sent to senior colleagues in the field for editing before they are finally published.

 

  1.      Quality Assurance

 

The development of the course materials is on going. These and other new course materials to be developed will be monitored internally by course coordinators and programme leaders while external course assessors and editors will be maintained to obtain good quality products.

 

7.1       Staffing

 

The National Open University of Nigeria has chosen to operate on small academic faculty staff supported on the field by Instructional Facilitators who are situated at the many Study Centres of the University designed to improve quality.

 

Headquarters Staff:

 

S/N        NAME                         STATUS                    QUALIFICATIONS

 

S/N        NAME                         STATUS                    QUALIFICATIONS

 

1.  Prof  Ninalowo, A.M        Adjunct  Prof        Ph.D( York, Canada)

2.      Pro Atere,A.A                Adjunct  Prof          B.Sc. (Ib) 1988;  M.Sc. (Ibadan) (1991); Ph.D. (Ib) 2000 Criminology

3. Dr.  Abdullahi Shehu            Adjunct  Ass Prof        B.Sc (Hons) Zaria, M.Sc (Abuja), Ph.D.                                                                                         (Hong Kong)

4. Dr. Adegoke A.T                   Lecturer 1                B.Sc. (Ife) 1989;  M.Sc. (Ibadan) (1991); Ph.D. (Uyo) 2007

 

5. Mr.Igwe, D. O.                       Lecturer 11            B.Sc. (Lagos) 2001; Dip Crime (Lagos) 2003; M.Sc.                 .                                       (Lagos) 2004.  M.PhIL.  (Ibadan) 2010

    

6. Mr. Chukwunka, C.A.C        Asst. Lecturer              B.Sc. (Calabar) 1992, MILD (Lagos) 2002,M.Sc.               (Lagos) 2007.                                 .                                                                    

 

7. Mrs. Ebobo Urowoli Christiana. Asst. Lecturer.     B. A. History/Sociology. (Ife) 1995, M.Sc. (LASU) 2006,

 

,

                                                                 

7.2       Admission and Registration Procedure

One of the determinants of the quality of education provided is the quality of the admitted students. The procedure of admission would be based on academic qualifications, in as much as it satisfies the minimum prescribed by the NUC and in some cases with the appropriate regulatory professional body. A possible unintended fall out of the admission process may be an opportunity during the registration exercise where some formal interaction with the would-be students will be possible.

 

  • To determine the pre-entry level of the prospective candidates.
  • To allow for scientific selection of students without creating biases.
  • To allow for proper placement of students at the desired entry level.

 

Generally admission process should be conducted in a flexible way to allow more students to have access to university education. This would be particularly in line with the individualisation of ODL concept. Cross-checking of relevant documents submitted would be carried out immediately to avoid future embarrassment.

 

7.3       Instructional Methods and Delivery

The mode of instruction is by distance mode. Students are to study essentially on their own by creating their own convenient learning environment. Face to face tutoring would only be handled by Instructional Facilitators at the designated Study Centres for specified periods based on credit loading of the course. The Programme will consist of Theory courses, Practical sessions and Research project.  For practical courses, the practical sessions would be held at designated laboratory centres across the country. Assessment for all courses will be by Tutor-Marked Assignments (TMAs) and end of Course examinations.

 

The Course Materials to be used in this programme would either be adopted and/or adapted from the Course Materials acquired from similar Open and Distance learning universities. The instructional methodologies adopted in the School of Education and which would be used for this programme, includes the use of specially designed packaged print materials. Future use of video and audiotapes, radio and television broadcast, CD-Rom and e-learning to complement the print material are in the pipeline.

 

7.4       Evaluation

Evaluation of each of the theory courses would consist of Tutor Marked Assignments and End of Course examination. The TMA constitute 30% of the total score. The End of Course examination is 70%. For practical courses, a practical component is introduced for scores achieved during the practical classes. This constitutes 30% of the total score. The TMA for practical courses is 30% and the End of course examination constitutes 40% of the total score.

 

7.4.1    Tutor Marked Assignment

As part of the evaluation mechanism, each course would be provided with 4 TMA’s out of which the best 3 would be used for the Continuous Assessments for a course. The best three would also be used for the practical courses. To qualify to sit for examination therefore, each student must turn in at least three TMA’s for each of the course.

 

 

 

 

 

7.4.2    End of Semester Examination

 

Each course will also be examined at the end of the semester. Course facilitators would be encouraged to provide data bank questions to the examination data bank in the School. Course coordinators and Programme leaders of the School of Education who are experts in the various course areas would be given the task of selecting two sets of question papers to conform to a particular house style and format provided by the School of Education Board of Examiners.  Thereafter the questions would be internally moderated by the Dean and in some cases, another staff member, before they are sent to an External Assessor for moderation. The external assessor will be chosen from tertiary institutions.

 

7.4.3    Marking of Examination Scripts

 

The marking guides for each course as moderated by the external assessor would be used in the marking of the scripts by the Course Facilitators.

 

7.5       Learners’ Support

 

Similar to other students receiving tertiary education, students in Distance Education require various academic and administrative support services from the university.  The existing academic support takes place presently at the various Study Centres with student Counsellors and Facilitators.  The School of Education on its own part will take steps to enhance Study facilitation by providing practical facilities for its practical based courses in selected centres and employ more facilitators.

 

8.0     TARGET GROUP

The Post Graduate Diploma Programme in Criminology and Security studies  is open and designed to Graduate students from Recognised Universities or its Equivalent with Third Class Honour or Pass or Lower Credit and for those coming Pure and Applied Sciences. Our target students fall within the wide category of the Old, the Young, the Working Class, the Unemployed and even the pensioners. Among the professionals and organised private or public sectors, we desire to have an in-road into the military and Para- military such as Immigration Service, the Custom, the (Navy, Army and Air Force), the Police, Multi-Nationals Companies, Oil and Gas Industries in order to broaden their knowledge and engage in practical understanding of major themes, issues, concepts, debates, discussions and arguments and formulating and presenting their views of peace and conflict resolution in Africa in particular and the entire world in general either to work with governments, multinationals, NGOs, aid agencies, the United Nations and other organisations.

 

9.0       STUDENT ENROLMENT AND PROJECTION:

We intent to start with about one thousand students nationwide at the initial stage. The moment the programme gains its expected popularity, we shall be having about three to five thousand students annually.

 

10.0      CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, Graduate of PGD Criminology and Security Studies are qualified for full ranges of careers open any social sciences or humanities students. The knowledge acquired will develop their high level of competence for critical thinking,  building up their criminological theories, widen their ability to understand and apply concepts in criminology and security studies, evaluate and analyse evidences/findings and communicate their findings clearly and effectively and then sharpen their criminology and security studies skills.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

1.0  Name of the Programme: PGD Criminology and Security Studies

Programme Code:    2301

 

2.0       Entry Requirements

To be admitted for the PGD Criminology and Security Studies, a candidate is expected to:

  1. Be a graduate from a recognized university with a minimum of a pass degree

 

             ii.         Possess qualifications adjudged to be equivalent to a first degree;

            

  1. Hold the HND with a minimum of lower credit from a recognized institution.

 

3.0       Philosophy, Aims and Objectives

 

 

3.1 Philosophy

The PGD in Criminology and Security Studies offer students an opportunity for advanced critical work in areas such as the social construction of crime, criminology and punishment; socio- legal studies; and equality; and governance and regulation. The program provides students with the analytical and research skills necessary for further graduate study; research or teaching; policy research and practice; employment in government/ non- government agencies, especially public and the private security sector.

 

3.2 Vision

To provide functional, cost-effective, flexible learning which adds life- long value to quality of education for all who seek Knowledge. There are in line with National Policy on education and within the  National Open University of Nigeria

 

The PGD Criminology and Security Studies programme has been developed to assist students in identifying the causes of crime and methods of controlling and preventing it. It also aims at building on their research expertise in such areas as security, policing, prisons, media, probation, and community safety, with a view to contributing to crime prevention and control policy development in the society. 

 

            

3.3       Aims

           

The PGD Criminology and Security Studies Programme aims at giving postgraduate students the opportunity to combine the intellectual adventure of contemplating some fundamental questions of order and control in contemporary societies with a strong sense of relevance to practical affairs. It  therefore provides graduates with a sound basis from which to pursue a wide range of careers in security, criminal justice and a range of “transferable skills” that are highly valued in today’s labour market.

 

3.4       Objectives

The programme essentially is designed to help graduates:

 

  1. understand  the key conceptual and substantive issues involved in the study of crime and security;

 

  1. acquire “transferable skills” and methods of criminological and security research geared towards crime prevention and control policy design and implementation;

 

  1. to be equipped to pursue in-depth studies of particular topics of theoretical and practical interest in crime and security;

 

  1. think on their own and advise government to take effective policy decisions on contemporary issues in criminology and security affecting the society. 

 

4. Programme Structure and Degree Rules

 

     4.1 Programme Structure:

     The PGD criminology and security studies programme is structured in 2 semesters as shown        below:

 

 

S/N

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

1st Semester

2.

CSS753

Research Methods in Criminology

3

C

3.

CSS755

Patterns and Trends of Crime in Nigeria

3

C

4.

CSS757

Contemporary Issues in Criminology and Security Studies

3

C

5.

CSS791

Emergency, Riot and Disaster Control Management

3

E

6.

CSS743

Principles of Security Practice and Management

3

C

8

CSS745

Types and  Analysis of Security Threats

3

C

9.

CIT 753

Introduction to the Internet

2

C

10.

GST707

Good Study Guide

2

C

11.

CIT701

Computer Fundamentals

2

C

 

 

Total Credit Units

30

 

2nd Semester

1.

CSS742

Policing and Law Enforcement in Nigeria

3

C

2.

CSS772

Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria

3

C

3.

CSS774

Prisons and Correctional Institutions in Nigeria

3

E

4.

CSS732

Project

6

C

5.

CSS744

Security Planning, Development, and Organisation

3

C

6.

CSS746

Legal and Social Framework of Private Security in Nigeria

3

C

7.

CSS747

Technical/Electronics Aspects of Security.

3

C

8.

CSS 791

Emergency, Riot and Disaster Control Management

3

E

 

 

Total Credit Units

27

 

Students must pass all CSS, GST and CIT courses and two elective courses. 

 

 

 

 

 

4.2       Degree Rules. To graduate with a PGD in Criminology and Security Studies, the students must have minimum of 35 credit units of Core courses and 2 units of Elective courses.

 

5.0     Course Development

 

The syllabus (syllabi) for all the courses are as described in the course description for all the courses on offer. All the courses are developed based on the resources found in Nigeria. Course Material writers are sourced from the crop of the specialists in the various tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The course materials are also sent to senior colleagues in the field for editing before they are finally published.

 

  1.      Quality Assurance

 

The development of the course materials is on going. These and other new course materials to be developed will be monitored internally by course coordinators and programme leaders while external course assessors and editors will be maintained to obtain good quality products.

 

7.1       Staffing

 

The National Open University of Nigeria has chosen to operate on small academic faculty staff supported on the field by Instructional Facilitators who are situated at the many Study Centres of the University designed to improve quality.

 

Headquarters Staff:

 

S/N        NAME                         STATUS                    QUALIFICATIONS

 

S/N        NAME                         STATUS                    QUALIFICATIONS

 

1.  Prof  Ninalowo, A.M        Adjunct  Prof        Ph.D( York, Canada)

2.      Pro Atere,A.A                Adjunct  Prof          B.Sc. (Ib) 1988;  M.Sc. (Ibadan) (1991); Ph.D. (Ib) 2000 Criminology

3. Dr.  Abdullahi Shehu            Adjunct  Ass Prof        B.Sc (Hons) Zaria, M.Sc (Abuja), Ph.D.                                                                                         (Hong Kong)

4. Dr. Adegoke A.T                   Lecturer 1                B.Sc. (Ife) 1989;  M.Sc. (Ibadan) (1991); Ph.D. (Uyo) 2007

 

5. Mr.Igwe, D. O.                       Lecturer 11            B.Sc. (Lagos) 2001; Dip Crime (Lagos) 2003; M.Sc.                 .                                       (Lagos) 2004.  M.PhIL.  (Ibadan) 2010

    

6. Mr. Chukwunka, C.A.C        Asst. Lecturer              B.Sc. (Calabar) 1992, MILD (Lagos) 2002,M.Sc.               (Lagos) 2007.                                 .                                                                    

 

7. Mrs. Ebobo Urowoli Christiana. Asst. Lecturer.     B. A. History/Sociology. (Ife) 1995, M.Sc. (LASU) 2006,

 

,

                                                                 

7.2       Admission and Registration Procedure

One of the determinants of the quality of education provided is the quality of the admitted students. The procedure of admission would be based on academic qualifications, in as much as it satisfies the minimum prescribed by the NUC and in some cases with the appropriate regulatory professional body. A possible unintended fall out of the admission process may be an opportunity during the registration exercise where some formal interaction with the would-be students will be possible.

 

  • To determine the pre-entry level of the prospective candidates.
  • To allow for scientific selection of students without creating biases.
  • To allow for proper placement of students at the desired entry level.

 

Generally admission process should be conducted in a flexible way to allow more students to have access to university education. This would be particularly in line with the individualisation of ODL concept. Cross-checking of relevant documents submitted would be carried out immediately to avoid future embarrassment.

 

7.3       Instructional Methods and Delivery

The mode of instruction is by distance mode. Students are to study essentially on their own by creating their own convenient learning environment. Face to face tutoring would only be handled by Instructional Facilitators at the designated Study Centres for specified periods based on credit loading of the course. The Programme will consist of Theory courses, Practical sessions and Research project.  For practical courses, the practical sessions would be held at designated laboratory centres across the country. Assessment for all courses will be by Tutor-Marked Assignments (TMAs) and end of Course examinations.

 

The Course Materials to be used in this programme would either be adopted and/or adapted from the Course Materials acquired from similar Open and Distance learning universities. The instructional methodologies adopted in the School of Education and which would be used for this programme, includes the use of specially designed packaged print materials. Future use of video and audiotapes, radio and television broadcast, CD-Rom and e-learning to complement the print material are in the pipeline.

 

7.4       Evaluation

Evaluation of each of the theory courses would consist of Tutor Marked Assignments and End of Course examination. The TMA constitute 30% of the total score. The End of Course examination is 70%. For practical courses, a practical component is introduced for scores achieved during the practical classes. This constitutes 30% of the total score. The TMA for practical courses is 30% and the End of course examination constitutes 40% of the total score.

 

7.4.1    Tutor Marked Assignment

As part of the evaluation mechanism, each course would be provided with 4 TMA’s out of which the best 3 would be used for the Continuous Assessments for a course. The best three would also be used for the practical courses. To qualify to sit for examination therefore, each student must turn in at least three TMA’s for each of the course.

 

 

 

 

 

7.4.2    End of Semester Examination

 

Each course will also be examined at the end of the semester. Course facilitators would be encouraged to provide data bank questions to the examination data bank in the School. Course coordinators and Programme leaders of the School of Education who are experts in the various course areas would be given the task of selecting two sets of question papers to conform to a particular house style and format provided by the School of Education Board of Examiners.  Thereafter the questions would be internally moderated by the Dean and in some cases, another staff member, before they are sent to an External Assessor for moderation. The external assessor will be chosen from tertiary institutions.

 

7.4.3    Marking of Examination Scripts

 

The marking guides for each course as moderated by the external assessor would be used in the marking of the scripts by the Course Facilitators.

 

7.5       Learners’ Support

 

Similar to other students receiving tertiary education, students in Distance Education require various academic and administrative support services from the university.  The existing academic support takes place presently at the various Study Centres with student Counsellors and Facilitators.  The School of Education on its own part will take steps to enhance Study facilitation by providing practical facilities for its practical based courses in selected centres and employ more facilitators.

 

8.0     TARGET GROUP

The Post Graduate Diploma Programme in Criminology and Security studies  is open and designed to Graduate students from Recognised Universities or its Equivalent with Third Class Honour or Pass or Lower Credit and for those coming Pure and Applied Sciences. Our target students fall within the wide category of the Old, the Young, the Working Class, the Unemployed and even the pensioners. Among the professionals and organised private or public sectors, we desire to have an in-road into the military and Para- military such as Immigration Service, the Custom, the (Navy, Army and Air Force), the Police, Multi-Nationals Companies, Oil and Gas Industries in order to broaden their knowledge and engage in practical understanding of major themes, issues, concepts, debates, discussions and arguments and formulating and presenting their views of peace and conflict resolution in Africa in particular and the entire world in general either to work with governments, multinationals, NGOs, aid agencies, the United Nations and other organisations.

 

9.0       STUDENT ENROLMENT AND PROJECTION:

We intent to start with about one thousand students nationwide at the initial stage. The moment the programme gains its expected popularity, we shall be having about three to five thousand students annually.

 

10.0      CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, Graduate of PGD Criminology and Security Studies are qualified for full ranges of careers open any social sciences or humanities students. The knowledge acquired will develop their high level of competence for critical thinking,  building up their criminological theories, widen their ability to understand and apply concepts in criminology and security studies, evaluate and analyse evidences/findings and communicate their findings clearly and effectively and then sharpen their criminology and security studies skills.

 

 


 

 

1.0  Name of the Programme: PGD Criminology and Security Studies

Programme Code:    2301

 

2.0       Entry Requirements

To be admitted for the PGD Criminology and Security Studies, a candidate is expected to:

  1. Be a graduate from a recognized university with a minimum of a pass degree

 

             ii.         Possess qualifications adjudged to be equivalent to a first degree;

            

  1. Hold the HND with a minimum of lower credit from a recognized institution.

 

3.0       Philosophy, Aims and Objectives

 

 

3.1 Philosophy

The PGD in Criminology and Security Studies offer students an opportunity for advanced critical work in areas such as the social construction of crime, criminology and punishment; socio- legal studies; and equality; and governance and regulation. The program provides students with the analytical and research skills necessary for further graduate study; research or teaching; policy research and practice; employment in government/ non- government agencies, especially public and the private security sector.

 

3.2 Vision

To provide functional, cost-effective, flexible learning which adds life- long value to quality of education for all who seek Knowledge. There are in line with National Policy on education and within the  National Open University of Nigeria

 

The PGD Criminology and Security Studies programme has been developed to assist students in identifying the causes of crime and methods of controlling and preventing it. It also aims at building on their research expertise in such areas as security, policing, prisons, media, probation, and community safety, with a view to contributing to crime prevention and control policy development in the society. 

 

            

3.3       Aims

           

The PGD Criminology and Security Studies Programme aims at giving postgraduate students the opportunity to combine the intellectual adventure of contemplating some fundamental questions of order and control in contemporary societies with a strong sense of relevance to practical affairs. It  therefore provides graduates with a sound basis from which to pursue a wide range of careers in security, criminal justice and a range of “transferable skills” that are highly valued in today’s labour market.

 

3.4       Objectives

The programme essentially is designed to help graduates:

 

  1. understand  the key conceptual and substantive issues involved in the study of crime and security;

 

  1. acquire “transferable skills” and methods of criminological and security research geared towards crime prevention and control policy design and implementation;

 

  1. to be equipped to pursue in-depth studies of particular topics of theoretical and practical interest in crime and security;

 

  1. think on their own and advise government to take effective policy decisions on contemporary issues in criminology and security affecting the society. 

 

4. Programme Structure and Degree Rules

 

     4.1 Programme Structure:

     The PGD criminology and security studies programme is structured in 2 semesters as shown        below:

 

 

S/N

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

1st Semester

2.

CSS753

Research Methods in Criminology

3

C

3.

CSS755

Patterns and Trends of Crime in Nigeria

3

C

4.

CSS757

Contemporary Issues in Criminology and Security Studies

3

C

5.

CSS791

Emergency, Riot and Disaster Control Management

3

E

6.

CSS743

Principles of Security Practice and Management

3

C

8

CSS745

Types and  Analysis of Security Threats

3

C

9.

CIT 753

Introduction to the Internet

2

C

10.

GST707

Good Study Guide

2

C

11.

CIT701

Computer Fundamentals

2

C

 

 

Total Credit Units

30

 

2nd Semester

1.

CSS742

Policing and Law Enforcement in Nigeria

3

C

2.

CSS772

Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria

3

C

3.

CSS774

Prisons and Correctional Institutions in Nigeria

3

E

4.

CSS732

Project

6

C

5.

CSS744

Security Planning, Development, and Organisation

3

C

6.

CSS746

Legal and Social Framework of Private Security in Nigeria

3

C

7.

CSS747

Technical/Electronics Aspects of Security.

3

C

8.

CSS 791

Emergency, Riot and Disaster Control Management

3

E

 

 

Total Credit Units

27

 

Students must pass all CSS, GST and CIT courses and two elective courses. 

 

 

 

 

 

4.2       Degree Rules. To graduate with a PGD in Criminology and Security Studies, the students must have minimum of 35 credit units of Core courses and 2 units of Elective courses.

 

5.0     Course Development

 

The syllabus (syllabi) for all the courses are as described in the course description for all the courses on offer. All the courses are developed based on the resources found in Nigeria. Course Material writers are sourced from the crop of the specialists in the various tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The course materials are also sent to senior colleagues in the field for editing before they are finally published.

 

  1.      Quality Assurance

 

The development of the course materials is on going. These and other new course materials to be developed will be monitored internally by course coordinators and programme leaders while external course assessors and editors will be maintained to obtain good quality products.

 

7.1       Staffing

 

The National Open University of Nigeria has chosen to operate on small academic faculty staff supported on the field by Instructional Facilitators who are situated at the many Study Centres of the University designed to improve quality.

 

Headquarters Staff:

 

S/N        NAME                         STATUS                    QUALIFICATIONS

 

S/N        NAME                         STATUS                    QUALIFICATIONS

 

1.  Prof  Ninalowo, A.M        Adjunct  Prof        Ph.D( York, Canada)

2.      Pro Atere,A.A                Adjunct  Prof          B.Sc. (Ib) 1988;  M.Sc. (Ibadan) (1991); Ph.D. (Ib) 2000 Criminology

3. Dr.  Abdullahi Shehu            Adjunct  Ass Prof        B.Sc (Hons) Zaria, M.Sc (Abuja), Ph.D.                                                                                         (Hong Kong)

4. Dr. Adegoke A.T                   Lecturer 1                B.Sc. (Ife) 1989;  M.Sc. (Ibadan) (1991); Ph.D. (Uyo) 2007

 

5. Mr.Igwe, D. O.                       Lecturer 11            B.Sc. (Lagos) 2001; Dip Crime (Lagos) 2003; M.Sc.                 .                                       (Lagos) 2004.  M.PhIL.  (Ibadan) 2010

    

6. Mr. Chukwunka, C.A.C        Asst. Lecturer              B.Sc. (Calabar) 1992, MILD (Lagos) 2002,M.Sc.               (Lagos) 2007.                                 .                                                                    

 

7. Mrs. Ebobo Urowoli Christiana. Asst. Lecturer.     B. A. History/Sociology. (Ife) 1995, M.Sc. (LASU) 2006,

 

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7.2       Admission and Registration Procedure

One of the determinants of the quality of education provided is the quality of the admitted students. The procedure of admission would be based on academic qualifications, in as much as it satisfies the minimum prescribed by the NUC and in some cases with the appropriate regulatory professional body. A possible unintended fall out of the admission process may be an opportunity during the registration exercise where some formal interaction with the would-be students will be possible.

 

  • To determine the pre-entry level of the prospective candidates.
  • To allow for scientific selection of students without creating biases.
  • To allow for proper placement of students at the desired entry level.

 

Generally admission process should be conducted in a flexible way to allow more students to have access to university education. This would be particularly in line with the individualisation of ODL concept. Cross-checking of relevant documents submitted would be carried out immediately to avoid future embarrassment.

 

7.3       Instructional Methods and Delivery

The mode of instruction is by distance mode. Students are to study essentially on their own by creating their own convenient learning environment. Face to face tutoring would only be handled by Instructional Facilitators at the designated Study Centres for specified periods based on credit loading of the course. The Programme will consist of Theory courses, Practical sessions and Research project.  For practical courses, the practical sessions would be held at designated laboratory centres across the country. Assessment for all courses will be by Tutor-Marked Assignments (TMAs) and end of Course examinations.

 

The Course Materials to be used in this programme would either be adopted and/or adapted from the Course Materials acquired from similar Open and Distance learning universities. The instructional methodologies adopted in the School of Education and which would be used for this programme, includes the use of specially designed packaged print materials. Future use of video and audiotapes, radio and television broadcast, CD-Rom and e-learning to complement the print material are in the pipeline.

 

7.4       Evaluation

Evaluation of each of the theory courses would consist of Tutor Marked Assignments and End of Course examination. The TMA constitute 30% of the total score. The End of Course examination is 70%. For practical courses, a practical component is introduced for scores achieved during the practical classes. This constitutes 30% of the total score. The TMA for practical courses is 30% and the End of course examination constitutes 40% of the total score.

 

7.4.1    Tutor Marked Assignment

As part of the evaluation mechanism, each course would be provided with 4 TMA’s out of which the best 3 would be used for the Continuous Assessments for a course. The best three would also be used for the practical courses. To qualify to sit for examination therefore, each student must turn in at least three TMA’s for each of the course.

 

 

 

 

 

7.4.2    End of Semester Examination

 

Each course will also be examined at the end of the semester. Course facilitators would be encouraged to provide data bank questions to the examination data bank in the School. Course coordinators and Programme leaders of the School of Education who are experts in the various course areas would be given the task of selecting two sets of question papers to conform to a particular house style and format provided by the School of Education Board of Examiners.  Thereafter the questions would be internally moderated by the Dean and in some cases, another staff member, before they are sent to an External Assessor for moderation. The external assessor will be chosen from tertiary institutions.

 

7.4.3    Marking of Examination Scripts

 

The marking guides for each course as moderated by the external assessor would be used in the marking of the scripts by the Course Facilitators.

 

7.5       Learners’ Support

 

Similar to other students receiving tertiary education, students in Distance Education require various academic and administrative support services from the university.  The existing academic support takes place presently at the various Study Centres with student Counsellors and Facilitators.  The School of Education on its own part will take steps to enhance Study facilitation by providing practical facilities for its practical based courses in selected centres and employ more facilitators.

 

8.0     TARGET GROUP

The Post Graduate Diploma Programme in Criminology and Security studies  is open and designed to Graduate students from Recognised Universities or its Equivalent with Third Class Honour or Pass or Lower Credit and for those coming Pure and Applied Sciences. Our target students fall within the wide category of the Old, the Young, the Working Class, the Unemployed and even the pensioners. Among the professionals and organised private or public sectors, we desire to have an in-road into the military and Para- military such as Immigration Service, the Custom, the (Navy, Army and Air Force), the Police, Multi-Nationals Companies, Oil and Gas Industries in order to broaden their knowledge and engage in practical understanding of major themes, issues, concepts, debates, discussions and arguments and formulating and presenting their views of peace and conflict resolution in Africa in particular and the entire world in general either to work with governments, multinationals, NGOs, aid agencies, the United Nations and other organisations.

 

9.0       STUDENT ENROLMENT AND PROJECTION:

We intent to start with about one thousand students nationwide at the initial stage. The moment the programme gains its expected popularity, we shall be having about three to five thousand students annually.

 

10.0      CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, Graduate of PGD Criminology and Security Studies are qualified for full ranges of careers open any social sciences or humanities students. The knowledge acquired will develop their high level of competence for critical thinking,  building up their criminological theories, widen their ability to understand and apply concepts in criminology and security studies, evaluate and analyse evidences/findings and communicate their findings clearly and effectively and then sharpen their criminology and security studies skills.