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  1. About the Programme
  1. Name of the Programme: Criminology and Security studies Code:2208
  2. Name of school in which the Programme is offered : School of Arts and Social Sciences
  3. Date of approval of the Programme: MARCH, 2004
  4. Name and qualification(s) of the Dean
  5. Name and qualification(s) of the Head of Unit: Dr Adegoke, A.T  B.Sc (Ife), M. Sc ( Ibadan), Ph.D (Uyo)

 

  1. Programme Philosophy, Vision, Mission and Objectives:

Philosophy

Consistent with the university’s vision of making education accessible, flexible, lifelong and affordable, B.Sc. Criminology and Security Studies equips students with criminological theories and research that empower them to carry out, with minimum supervision, advance work in areas such as the social construction of crime, sentencing and treatment of offender, penology, victimology, criminal justice and other contemporary issues of crime such as gender and crime, class and crime, dynamics and the criminality of law enforcement. We also equip them with the principles of security practice and management, technical and electronics aspects of security, information system security and basic security threats. In addition the program also provides students with the skills and the needed platform to interrogate, investigate and analyse criminal tendencies necessary for further graduate study.

 

 Vision

To provide functional, cost-effective, flexible learning which adds life- long value to quality of education for all who seek Knowledge. There are in line with National Policy on education and within the  National Open University of Nigeria

 

Aim and Objectives:

The B.Sc Criminology and Security Studies Programme is designed to introduce students to the causes, manifestations, and consequences of criminal behaviour and security. It offers thorough descriptions and explanations of criminal behaviour upon which effective social policy and social agencies must be developed.

 

Aim       

The B.Sc Criminology and Security Studies Programme aims at giving the undergraduate students the basic knowledge in areas such as social structure and cultural practices, forms of human behaviour, legal theory, social science and the law, criminological theory, victimology and regulatory issues. In addition to substantive areas of security, prevention and control of crime, areas of law such as family, criminal, environmental, immigration, procedural and constitutional law, are also examined. This is done with a view to sensitizing students to the process by which criminal justice policies (including laws and institutions such as the police, prison, etc) are created and developed and the theoretical and empirical analysis of the implementation of such policy by examining how these institutions function and attempts to assess the social consequences of these policies so as to suggest new reforms or alternative measures of a more moderate nature and more respectful of human dignity.

 

 

 

 

3.2          Objectives

The B.Sc Criminology and Security Studies Programme is designed mainly to equip the students with the wherewithal in the areas of crime prevention and control, and the theoretical and empirical analysis of security policies and implementation. Specifically, the programme sets out to:

    • Equip Students with the skills to demonstrate leadership qualities in the fight against crime and how to effectively manage a security unit.

 

    • Equip Students with effective skills to analyses and formulate social policies towards the development of social agencies.

 

    • Encourage Students to pursue further studies in the discipline

 

( C )        ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

100 level

Candidates who wish to study Criminology and Security Studies must have obtained a credit in English Language and a pass in mathematics plus credit pass in either economics, geography or science and other two subjects at the SSC, NABTEB, NECO, GCE or their equivalent not more than two sitting.

 

200 level

Candidates for Direct Entry admission shall possess five credit passes in the SSE, NECO, GCE and at least two advanced level, or Equivalent of NCE OR OND certificates with merit pass in Arts and Social Science disciplines.  For emphasis credit passes in English Language, Mathematics and any of Economic, Geography or Government is compulsory.

 

 

100 LEVEL

S/N

Course

Code

Course Titles

Units

Status

1.

GST 101

Use of English and Communication Skills I

2

C

2

GST 107

The Good Study Guide

2

C

3

GST 105

History and Philosophy of Science

2

C

4

CSS 111

Introduction to Sociology

3

C

5

CSS 121

Introduction to Psychology

3

C

6

CSS 131

Introduction to Political Science

3

E

7

CSS 133

Introduction to Criminology I

2

C

         

9

CIT 101

Computer in Society

2

C

8

ECO121

Principles of  Economics

3

E

 

 

Total

23

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses                                               12

Core Courses (Specialization Area)                                          8

Minimum elective required                                                       3

Sub-Total   =                                                                            23

 

2nd Semester

1.

GST 102

Use of English and Communication  skills II

2

C

2.

CSS 152

Introduction to Nigerian Criminal Law

3

C

3.

CSS 112

Sociology of Law

3

C

4

CSS132

Ethnography and social structure of Nigeria

3

C

5.

CSS 136

Introduction to Criminology II

3

C

6

CSS134

Geography of Nigeria

3

E

7.

CIT 102

Application Software Skills

2

C

8.

POL 126

Citizen and the State

3

E

 

 

Total

19

 

 

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses

Core Courses (Specialization Area)

Minimum elective required

Sub-Total   =

 

         4

       12

         3

       19

 

 

200 LEVEL                                                                                                           

S/N

Course

Code

Course Titles

Units

Status

1.

CSS 211

The Sociology of Crime and Delinquency

3

C

2.

CSS 241

Basic Security and Security Threats

3

C

3.

CSS 231

Methods of Social Research

3

C

4.

CSS 243

Principles of Security Practice and Management

3

C

5

GST 203

Introduction to Philosophy and Logic

2

C

6.

CSS 245

Security Planning, Development and Organization

2

C

7

LAW100

Introduction to Law

4

E

         
         

8

LAW211

Nigerian Legal System 1

4

E

         

 

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses

Core Courses (Specialization Area)

Minimum elective required

Sub-Total   =

 

         2

       14

      4                       20

 

2nd Semester

1.

CSS 212

The Sociology of Punishment and Corrections

3

 C

2.

CSS 242

Measurements and Patterns of Crimes and Delinquency

3

C

3.

CSS 244

Types and Analysis of Security Threats

3

C

4.

CSS 246

Legal and Social Framework of Private Security Services in Nigeria

3

C

5.

GST202

Fundamentals of Peace Studies

2

C

6.

PCR 272

Concepts and Practice of Peace Building

3

E

7.

LAW212

Nigerian Legal System 11

4

E

8.

PCR 274

Introduction to Conflict Transformation

3

E

 

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses

Core Courses (Specialization Area)

Minimum elective required

Sub-Total   =

 

         2

       12

         3

       17

 

 

 

300 LEVEL 1ST Semester

S/N

Course

Code

Course Titles

Units

Status

1.

CSS 341

Policing and Law Enforcement in Nigeria

3

C

2.

CSS 371

Courts and Justice  Administration in Nigeria

3

C

3.

CSS 351

Prisons and Correction of Offenders in Nigeria

3

C

4.

CSS 361

Juvenile Institutions and Juvenile Corrections in Nigeria

3

C

5.

CSS 343

Information Systems Security Management

3

C

6.

CSS 381

Domestic Violence

3

E

7.

GST 301

Entrepreneurship Studies I

2

C

8.

Law 341

Criminal Law 1

4

E

9.

PCR 373

Demobilization, Disarmament and Reintegration

3

E

 

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses

Core Courses (Specialization Area)

Minimum elective required

Sub-Total   =

 

         2

       15

         3

       20

 

 

 

 

2nd Semester

1.

CSS 352

Theory of Crime and Crime Control

3

C

2.

CSS 354

Special Categories of Offenders

3

C

3.

CSS 356

Traditional and Informal Mechanisms of Crime

3

C

4.

CSS 342

Safety Management for Loss Prevention

3

C

5.

GST 302

Entrepreneurship Studies II

2

C

6.

PCR 362

Urban Violence and Security

3

E

7.

LAW342

Criminal Law II

4

E

 

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses

Core Courses (Specialization Area)

Minimum elective required

Sub-Total   =

 

         2

       12

        3

       17

 

400 LEVEL

1ST Semester

S/N

Course

Code

Course Titles

Units

Status

1.

CSS 431

Field Observations

6

C

2.

CSS 441

Technical/Electronics Aspects of Security

3

C

3.

CSS445

Forensic Science

3

C

4.

CSS 443

Traffic/ Road Safety and Equipment

3

C

5.

CSS 491

Emergency, Riot and Disaster Control Management

3

C

6.

PCR 375

Language and Information Management in Peace & Conflict Resolution

3

E

7.

LAW243

Constitutional Law 1

4

E

8.

ENG 453

Language and National Development

3

E

 

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses

Core Courses (Specialization Area)

Minimum elective required

Sub-Total   =

 

         -

      18

        3

       21

 

2nd Semester                                  

1

CSS 433

Project

6

C

2

CSS 432

Human Rights Provision in Nigeria

3

C

4

CSS 442

Professional Ethics in Law Enforcement & Security Management

3

C

5

CSS 452

Victims of Crimes and Human Rights Violations

3

C

6

PCR 415

The Nature of Global Terrorism

3

E

7

PCR412

Globalization and Peace

3

E

8

LAW244

Constitutional Law II

4

E

 

 

Minimum Credit Units Required

GST and Other General Courses

Core Courses (Specialization Area)

Minimum elective required

Sub-Total   =

 

         -

       19

        3

       22

 

 

 

Summary of Distribution of Course Credit by level

Level

GST and other General Courses

SUBJECT/SPECIALIZATION AREA CRIMINOLOGY AND SECURITY STUDIES

TOTAL

COMPULSORY

ELECTIVE (MIN)

100

12

20

06

38

200

04

20

06

30

300

04

27

06

37

400

-

39

06

45

Total

20

106

24

150

 

Summary of Distribution of Minimum Course Credit Units to be earned by Student with Direct Entry Admission

Levell

GST   and Other

General Courses

SUBJECT  /SPECIALIZATION

AREA

 Total

 

 

               Compulsory

Elective  (min.)

 

100

         12

-

-

12

200

           4

20

6

30

300

           4

27

6

37

400

           -

39

6

45

Total

          20

86

18

124

 

 

For the award of a B.Sc degree in Criminology and Security Studies, students must have a minimum of 120     credits units of core courses and 12 units of Elective Courses for an 8 Semester Structure and 90 credit. Unit of core courses and 10 units of Elective courses for a 6 semester structure.

 

COURSE SPECIFICATIONS

GST 101:               Use of English and Communications Skills I (2 credit Units, C)

Listening: Enabling Skills and note taking, comprehension and information retrieval: General, comprehensive and information retrieval: Data, figures, Diagrams, and charts, listening for main ideas, for interpretation and critical evaluation Effective reading, skimming, and scanning, Reading and comprehending at varying speed level 1.

 

GST 107                The Good Study Guide (2 credit units, C)

Getting started, Reading and Note taking, other ways of study, working with numbers, what is good writing? How to write essays, preparing for examination.

 

CSS 111:               Introduction to Sociology (3 credit units, C)

Definition of sociology, family, marriage, society, and culture, socialization; Conforming, deviance, power, authority, leadership, social organizations, Group, social differentiation, religion, social interactions, social stratification, social mobility, collective behaviour, public opinion and propaganda, social change.

 

BHM 101:            Introduction to Economics (3 credit units, C)

Public finance, national income accounting, Nigeria economy, Economic development growth and planning, Demand and Supply of money, Various types of finance and deflation monetary and fiscal policies, Capital and money market, Public finance, Taxation and fiscal policy, Public debt, Concept of  Unemployment.

 

CSS 121:               Introduction to Psychology (3 credit units, C)

Definition of psychology, Approaches to the study of psychology, some basic concepts in psychology, specialties in psychology, how psychologists develop and test their theories, intelligence, perception, personality trait, socialization, juvenile delinquency, Behaviour modification, Human aggression, Accuracy of judgment

 

CSS 131:               Introduction to Political Science (3 credit units, C)                                                           

The nature and scope of political science, subject matter, the legalistic and behavioural approach to the study of political science. Nature, purpose and functions of sovereignty, power and authority, coups, reforms and revolution and the issue of international relations.

 

CSS 133:               Introduction to Criminology. (3 credit units, C)

In this course, Students are exposed to the definition of terms, historical development and theoretical perspectives focusing on crime as individual phenomenon (constitutional and Biological factors) on the one hand and on the other hand, crime as a social phenomenon.

 

CSS 112:               Sociology of Law (3 credit units, C)

This course introduces students to the definition of the concepts of law and sociology, theoretical perspectives and nature of law and  jurisprudence. How law is related to morality, customs, force, justice, freedom, rule of law etc. It goes further to examine the Nigerian Legal system in both colonial and pre-colonial era, issues in the development of the  Nigerian legal system, the emerging legal structure of Nigeria, the impact of colonial experience, political independence on Nigeria’s legal system, the influence of modern global trends, problems and prospects.

 

 

CSS 211:               The Sociology of Crime and Delinquency (3 credit units, C)

This course covers the following: Sociological Theory of Criminal behaviour; Psychoanalysis and Crime; Motives for law violation; Differential Association – Reinforcement Theory of Criminal behaviour; Epidemiology and individual conduct; Law, Social change, emerging legal structure of Nigeria and crime and delinquency; The Nigerian legal system (outline only), and Crime and delinquency. 

 

CSS 241:               Security Threats and Types of Analysis (3 credit units, C)

Items Under this Course includes Threats Such as :Industrial Espionage and information theft, Cyber Crime, Bomb Threat, Hijack, Kidnap, Hostage-taking, Assassination, Chemical Biological and Radiological Attack threat, Plane Crash, Explosion, Earthquake, Environmental Pollution, Armed Robbery attack, Strikes, Demonstrations and Mob actions etc.  The various ways of analyzing these threats for crime prevention, detection and control are, vulnerability analysis, risk analysis, basic impact analysis, crime analysis, threat/risk mapping and security survey and risk identification analysis.

 

CSS 231:               Methods of Social Research ( 3 credit units, C )

Research perspectives, design and planning, methods and techniques, application, ethics and report writing.

 

CSS 243:               Principles of Security Practice and Management. (3 credit units, C)

The course content includes: Principles of Security and Practical application: Security Management; Security Personnel Management and Training; Operational Management; Public Relations Management, Theory of Crime Control; Violence-domestic and non-domestic with particular emphasis on domestic violence and Social Policy implications.

 

CSS 212:               The Sociology of Punishment and Corrections (3 credit units, C)               

This course introduces forms of punishment systems, punishment and corrections as       products of historical, cultural and political changes, differences by race agenda in punishment and correction, problems of social control and violence in prisons, alternative rehabilitation and community prevention strategies.

 

CSS 242: Measurements and Patterns of Crime and Delinquency (3 credit units, C)

This course introduces the nature and extent of crime and delinquency by emphasizing upon contemporary problems. It also stresses project design, sampling, measurement and the addictive disorders, crime and delinquency and other social anomalies.

 

CSS 244                Basic Security and Security Threats (3 credit units, C)

This course introduces students to the evolution and development of security through early civilization to Nigeria Experience. It sensitizes students to the scope of security and the relationship between criminology and security studies. It also exposes students to the understanding of security concepts, issues, principles etc the foundation upon which all other security are built. It examines the procedural, physical and electronic implications in security operations. It emphasizes on the level employee honesty and internal / external crime threat prevention, while trying to build necessary control and counter measures. It    finally examines threat to life, property and information such as armed robbery attacks, fire, assassinations, hire jack, bomb treat ,industrial espionages and competitive intelligence and all forms of terrorism, environmental pollution etc with a view to proffering solutions for prevention and control.

 

 

CSS 245:               Security Planning, Development and Organization (3 credit units, C)

This course introduces students to the principles and techniques that will provide management in any organization with a series of procedures that can be use full in the planning, implementation, administration and evaluation of protection programmes. It will also expose students to the inherent problems and weakness that have hindered their progress over the years such as narrow view of security and protective services, universal cures and inadequate training.

 

CSS 246:               Legal and social Framework of Private Security Services in Nigeria. (3 credit units, C)

This course introduces examines the multi-faceted implications and problem of the use of the different services provided by these private actors. It also explores the advantages and disadvantages of privatization and commercialization induced by the outsourcing of the state’s monopoly over the use of violence for the provision of public good of security and order, and the problems states incur by the use of contracted security services for both direct control and indirect control over force and the bases of their authority.

 

CSS 341:               Policing and Law Enforcement in Nigeria (3 credit units, C )

In this course students are introduced to the history, organization and Administration of the pre-modern and modern Nigerian police force. It examines the formal, informal and specialized units of the public, police role in the community, professionalism, corruption, militarization, liability and responsibility.

 

CSS 352:               Theories of Crime and Crime Control (3 credit units, C )

In this course students are exposed to the sociology of punishment, review of theories of crime control, consequences of crime and delinquencies. They are also exposed to critic of causal theories, official and private responses, crime control and prevention theories, policy implication, execution and contemporary issues of crime prevention and control.

 

CSS 371:               Courts and Justice Administration in Nigeria (3 credit units, C).

In this course, students are introduced to the criminal justice system, crime victims and law enforcement administration. It also exposes them to the functions of the police in criminal justice administration, major current responsibilities of the police, the judiciary or courts administration, Nigeria penal process, prisons/correctional Institutions Sentencing and Treatment of offenders.

 

CSS 351:               Prisons and Corrections of offenders in Nigeria ( 3 credit units, C )

In this course students are introduced to the history and evolution of prisons and correctional environment. It also exposes them to the philosophy and aims of punishment, development of penal policy, correctional systems and post conviction procedures. The course also examines treatment mode as against justice model, public and official attitudes to punishment and treatments of offender’s role of imprisonment and its consequences, conductions of prisons, alternatives to prison, prison policies and future of Nigerian prisons.

 

CSS 361: Juvenile Institutions and Juvenile Corrections in Nigeria ( 3 credit units, C )

This course describes the underline philosophy of juvenile justices and the history of child welfare in Nigeria. It goes further to discuss the treatment of offenders and juvenile institution such as remind homes, foster institution, welfare homes and after care or release services for juvenile offenders. It also examines the law and juvenile justices system, criticizes the system and institution and discusses the non-institutional treatment method for juvenile offenders. 

 

 

CSS 354:               Categories of Offences and Offenders (3 credit units, C)

This course defines crime and describes element of an offence. It also introduces student to various classifications of offences into homicide treason rape, obtaining by force pretences, receiving stolen goods, burglary and house braking, stealing etc. and the theoretical background of punishment and the principles of sentencing and treatment of offenders. It also emphasizes on the role of the police in the administration of criminal justices.  

 

CSS 381:               Domestic Violence (3 credit units, C)

The courses discusses: Statistical Trends and Crimes of Violence according to legal classification; Reassessment of Crime of violence according to the factual substance; Incidence of detection and continuation; small background of the offenders; Penal records and previous history of violence; Domestic violence; courses; motives. Mechanisms of control; Standards of punishment; Subsequent conduct; patterns of criminal behaviour (outline only) some recent significant change(s).

 

CSS 356:               Traditional and Informal Mechanisms of Crime Control (3 credit units, C)

This course introduces us to the traditional use of age-grade system, norms and mores, oat taking, witchcraft, juju, and divination etc. in preventing detecting and controlling crime, which engenders discipline with sanctions to erring members of the society.

 

CSS 343:               Information Systems Security Management (3 credit units, C)

In this course, students are exposed to an in-depth examination of topics in the management of information technology security, including access control systems and methodology, business continuity and disaster recovery planning, legal issues in information systems security, ethics, and computer operations security. It also examines physical security, security architecture and models, using current standards and models.

 

CSS 342:               Safety Management for Loss Prevention ( 3 credit units, C )

This course introduces students to security role in safety industrial accidents, office emergencies First Aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). It   also exposes them to several industrial hazards, perils and risk. It examines several safety and environmental practices, accident reporting, investigation and record keeping. It also sensitizes students to safety policy formulation, planning and audits.

 

CSS 441:               Technical/Electronic Aspects of Security ( 3 credit units, C )

This course introduces intrusion detection systems such as alarms, sensors, motion detectors, etc. and close circuit television systems. It goes further to discuss access control and identification systems, including a two way communication system with clocking devises for guard tour systems and security operations management, it goes further to explain fire protection and suppression including automation. 

 

CSS 432:               Human Rights Provision in Nigeria ( 3 credit units, C )

This course describes the value and norms underlying the concept of universal human rights, and issues rose in promoting human rights in contemporary society. It includes examination of instances where the right of different individuals appear to clash, or wear different right appear to be in contradiction. It explores the limit of the right  (discourse) for example the right of unborn, minority right, animal right, a review of the international discourse on human right and the effectiveness of international regimes set up to protect or promote human right.  

 

 

CSS 443:               Traffic/Road Safety and Equipment ( 3 credit units, C )

This course introduces the key principles and practices in road safety and traffic control. Special emphasis is given to the broad context of road use/transport in society and the economic and social implications of road crashes. It introduces the basis of information retrieval, road crash analysis and interpretation, and the strategic development of road safety countermeasures and operational used of equipment.   

 

CSS 442: Professional Ethics in Law Enforcement and Security Management ( 3 credit units, C )

A description and analysis of law enforcement history and current practices, including the complex role of Nigerian police agent at all levels of government, models of the police services, critical issues affecting law enforcement and practice such as professional ethics, corruption and militarization and the progress towards confinement of offenders. 

 

CSS 491:               Emergency Riot and Disaster Control Management (3 credit units, C)

In this course students are introduced to the definition, facts types of emergency, primary consideration in an emergency, preparation threat identification scope, liaisons with external agencies, emergency controller, equipment, team formation evacuation, protecting vital records, disaster control, training drills and practices.

 

CSS 452:               Victims of Crime and Human Rights violations (3 credit units, C )

This course exposes students to the role and characteristics of victims of crime, social injustice, victim-offender relationship and the psychological impact of victimization and societal reaction to victimization. It further examines the treatment of victims in the justices system, the relationship between criminal victimization, human rights violations principles of social justice and contemporary development in policy and services to address the rights and needs of victims.

 

CSS 433:               Project (6 credit units, C)

The project is a substantial piece of work ‘Long Essay’ and is written under individual supervision on a subject of your choice within your Degree specialization.

 

5.0 LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION:

     The language of instruction for all courses is English.

 

  1. COURSE DEVELOPMENT:

              All course materials are to be developed locally in consonance with the NOUN in-house style.

 

  1. QUALITY ASSURANCE:

Once it pleases the Senate to approve this programme, we shall maintain high level of quality       assurance for all our courses. We shall insist on Total Quality Management (TQM) of all our programmes through qualitative method of admission that selects the best of qualified applicants, rigorous method of material development that allows for only the egg-heads available to generate items for us, appointment of qualified candidates as staff and facilitators that come to the aid of our students on request, adequate supervision of study centres to see to the smooth running of tutorials, tests and examinations.

 

 

 

 

8.0 LIBRARY:   

    The programme has access to the University Virtual Library.

 

9.0 RECOGNITION OF THE PROGRAMME:

By National University Commission’s benchmark, students are expected to have minimum of 120 units in any of the single honours in order to graduate. We are neither exceeding nor falling below the NUC minimum standard.

 

10. STAFFING   

We appoint only qualified and competent candidates as staff and facilitators to provide the best services and assistance desired by our students on request. We have two permanent staff at the Headquarters:

 

 

STAFF LIST FOR CRIMINOLOGY AND SECURITY STUDIES UNIT.

 

CRIMINOLOGY AND SECURITY STUDIES

S/N

NAME

QUALIFICATION WITH DATES

RANK

1

Prof  Ninalowo, A.M       

PhD Sociology (York University) 1983, MA. Sociology (Uni. of Windsor, Canada) 1979, BA. Psyc. & Sociology (Uni. of Windsor, Canada) 1977

Professor (Adjunct)

2

Prof  Adewole A. Atere

Ph.D. Criminology (Ibadan) 2000,  M.Sc. Criminology (Ibadan) (1991); B.Sc. Sociology (Ibadan) 1988; 

Professor (Adjunct)

3

Dr.  Abdullahi Shehu

Ph.D. Criminology (Hong Kong)  2003, M.Sc Criminology  (Abuja)1997, B.Sc (Hons) Zaria,

Associate Professor (Visiting)

4

Dr. Adegoke A.T                  

Ph.D. Criminology & Development (Uyo) 2007, M.Sc. Sociology  (Ibadan) 1991, B.Sc. Sociology & anthropology (Ife) 1989; 

Lecturer 1

5

Mr.Igwe, D. O.                      

M.PhIL. Criminology (Ibadan) 2010,  M.Sc. (Lagos) 2004.                             B.Sc. (Lagos) 2001; Dip Crime (Lagos) 2003;

Lecturer 11

6

Mr. Chukwunka, C.A.C       

Mild 2002, M.Sc. (Lagos) 2007, B.Sc. Sociology (Calabar) 1992,

Asst. Lecturer

7

Mrs. Ebobo Urowoli Christiana.

M.Sc. Criminology (LASU) 2006, B. A. History/Sociology. (Ife) 1995,

Asst  Lecturer

 

LECTURERS FOR ELECTIVE COURSES

8

Prof Olusegun Yerokun

LLB,BL( Middle Temple Lon), LLM, BL( Nig) Acis, ACTN

Professor

9

Dr. Emeka Nelson Chegwe

LLB,BL. LLM, PhD

Lecturer 1

10

Dr. (Col) Abiodun  J. Oluwadare  

Ph.D History & Strategic Studies (UNILAG ) 2014  M.A History & Strategic

Studies (2002 ) B.Sc. Pol. Science & Public Adm (UNIYO)1998. 

Senior Lecturer

11

Dr.Funke J.Oni

Ph.D English (Ibadan)2012 M.A. English (Ibadan)2005 B.A. English (Ado Ekiti) 2001

Lecturer 11

12

Dr. Bamiji Oyebode

 

Ph.D Peace and Conflict Studies 2012 M.A. Peace and Conflict Studies 2005 B.A. (Ed) Language Arts (English)1991

Lecturer 11

13

Dr. Olusola Ojo                

Ph.D Peace and Conflict Studies (Ibadan)   2013 M.A. Peace and Conflict Studies     ( Ibadan)   2004      B.A(Ed) History Ado-Ekiti 2002

Lecturer 11

14

Mr. Njoku C. Nduka

LLB,BL. LLM,

Lecturer 11

15

Dr. David Oba

Ph.D Pol Sc.( UNIBEN)2008, , M.Sc Pol Sc.( UNIBEN)1995 B.A. (Ed) Govt/Education(UNN)1989

Lecturer 1

16

Dr Rashid Okunola

PhD. Criminology (Ibadan) 2006, M.Sc. Criminology (Ibadan)1991;  B.Sc.Sociology & Anthropology (Sokoto) 1984; 

Senior Lecturer(Adjunct)

 

SUMMARY

S/N

RANK

TOTAL

1

Professor

3

2

Associate Professor

1

3

Senior Lecturer

2

4

Lecturer 1

3

5

Lecturer 11

5

7

Assistant Lecturer

2

 

GRAND TOTAL

16

 

 

 

 

APPOINTED B.Sc. FACILITATORS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINOLOGY AND SECURITY STUDIES

S/N

NAMES

QUALIFICATION

STUDY CENTRE

17

Dr. A. Omobowale

PhD; M.Sc (Sociology); B.Sc (Sociology)

Ibadan

18

Dr. Akim Akinwale

PhD; M.Sc (Sociology;

B.Sc (Sociology) - 1988

Lagos

19

Dr. Eze Nwokocha

PhD ; M.Sc (Sociology); B.Sc (Sociology)

Lagos

20

Dr. Abdullahi Shehu

PhD (Criminology)

 

Lagos

21

Dr. Amaechi Nzekwe    

PhD (Sociology/Criminology)

Jos

22

Dr. Rashid Okunola

PhD (Ph.D  (Sociology/Criminology)

Ibadan

23

Dr. Angela Ajodo-Adebanjoko

PhD (Ph.D  (Sociology/Criminology)

Lafia

24

Dr. Angela Ajodo-Adebanjoka

PhD (International Relations) – 2011

PGDE – 2006

M.Sc (International Relations) – 2002

B.Sc (Political Science) – 1997

Lafia

25

Dr. Nduka Nwabueze

PhD   (Sociology/Criminology)

Lagos

26

Dr. (Mrs) Bammeke F.

PhD (Sociology/Criminology)

Lagos

27

Dr. Marcel Eze

PhD (Sociology/Criminology)

Enugu

28

Dr. Christopher Ugwuoke

PhD (Sociology/Criminology)

Enugu

29

Dr. Bonaventure Nwokeoma

PhD (Sociology/Criminology)

Enugu

30

Dr. John Lekan Oyefara

PhD   (Sociology/Criminology)

Lagos

31

Dr. Daniel Ikuomola

PhD   (Sociology/Criminology)

Ekiti

32

Dr. Ogugua O.

PhD   (Sociology/Criminology)

Lagos

33

DR Abrifor Chiedu

PhD Criminology

Ogun

34

Mr. Amadi Nwagbaso

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc Sociology)

Enugu

35

Mr. Tobias Ozor           

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Enugu

36

Mr. Alamu Adetunji       

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Ilorin

37

Mr. Sunday Ojo

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

38

Mr. Obot Jeremiah Sunday

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Jos

39

Mr. Danjuma Mangai

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Jos

40

Mr. Sunday Ojo

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Lafia

41

Mr. Jacob Allu

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

42

Mrs. Ejue Frances U.

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Abuja

43

Mr. Abdullahi Adam

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Abuja

44

Mr. Crescent Sunday E.

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Abuja

45

Mr. Alamu Adetunji

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

Ilorin

46

Mr. Stephen Abang

M.Sc (Psychology; B.Sc (Psychology)

47

Mr. Sunday Ojo

M.Sc (Sociology; B.Sc (Sociology)

48

Mr. Igwe, D. O.

M.Sc (Sociology;  B.Sc (Sociology)

Lagos

49

Mr. Chukwunka C. A. C.

M.Sc (Sociology;  B.Sc (Sociology)

Lagos

50

Mrs. Ebobo U. C.

M.Sc (Sociology;  B.Sc (Sociology)

Lagos

51

Mrs. Salako Alero Elizabeth

M.Sc (Sociology;  B.Sc (Sociology)

Lagos

52

Mr. Gabriel Enamuda

M.Sc (Sociology;  B.Sc (Sociology)

Lagos

53

Mr. Ovie O.

M.Sc (Sociology;  B.Sc (Sociology)

Lagos

54

Mr. Anya Okoro

M.Sc (G&C;  B.Sc (G/C)

Lagos

55

Mrs. Aare folashade folake

LLB,BL LLM

Lagos

56

Mrs Funke A. Aje-Famuyide

LLB law Ilorin, LLM Ibadan,

 

57

Dr. Omotosho

BSc. Sociology & anthropology (ife), Msc Sociology (Ibadan), PhD Criminology & Penology (Ibadan)

Lagos

58

Mr. Raji Kayode Moshood

BSc Pol Science OOU, MSc Lagos.

Lagos

59

Mr. Ogbonna Hyginus Obinnachuks

BSc Sociology, Abia state university, 1996, MSc Sociology Unilag, 2011

Lagos

60

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                   

TOTAL NUMBER  OF THE FACILITATORS =       42

 

Apart from the above officers that are directing the affairs of the Programme at the Headquarters, we also have about facilitators at our various study centres all over the country

 

11.0        Admission and Registration Procedure

Our Admission and Registration Procedures are On-Line Based. Students are expected to purchase the form from any of the NOUN DESIGNATED BANKS and then fill and submit the form On-Line. Admission lists of all the successful candidates are published On-Line while admission letters are sent to our study centres nearest to students for collection. Students are also expected to complete their registration processes On-Line.

 

11.1        Instructional Methods and Delivery

Our instructional method is not the same with that of conventional University method of face-to-face lecture system. We distribute our comprehensively developed and well packaged printed course materials to the students during registration, which could be read at their convenient time. Face to face facilitation for each and every course is carried out by our qualified facilitators who attend to the educative needs of our students at our various designated centres all over the country. The soft copy of all these course materials have also been made available in the Compact Disc for any interested student to purchase. We also have Multi-Media delivery of lectures through our customized Radio and Television didactic programmes.

 

11.2 Evaluation

11.2.1 Tutor-Marked Assignment

Continuous assessments otherwise known as Tutor-Marked Assignments are carried out in the form of assignments and are based on the study course material for each course. The Tutor-Marked Assignments will constitute 30% of the total score.

 

 

 

11.3     End of Semester Examination

Our sessional examinations are semester based: we administer examinations for all the courses registered for by the students at the end of every semester. Except otherwise stated, each course will culminate in an end of semester examination. The examination constitutes 70% of the total score. The pass mark for the final examination is 40% of the total score.

 

 

 

 

11.4      Marking of Examination Scripts

Immediately after the Examinations, all scripts are brought to the Directorate of Examination and Assessment at the Headquarters. It is at this Directorate, in collaboration with the School concerned that we organise either conference marking or swap marking between study centres. 

 

11.5     LEARNERS’ SUPPORT

On realising the importance of Learners Support to our programmes and to our students, the University has consecrated a full-fledged Directorate of Learners Support to take care of the needs of our students in this regard.  Under this Directorate, we also have Career counsellors who counsel and guide our students. The facilitators at the Study centres, under the Learners support see to the grading of the tutor marked assignments. The assignments, which will be returned to the students with facilitators’ comments, will serve as a means for feedback, and will enable students to assess and improve on their performance.

 

12.  RECOGNITION OF THE PROGRAMME:

The contents of the programme have been benchmarked against the NUC minimum standard in Political Science of other recognised Universities

 

13. PROPOSED STARTING DATE AND PRESENTATION SCHEDULE

With the approval of the senate of the National Open University of Nigeria, the programme has already commenced with our first set of student now in four hundred level and it runs on semester basis.

      It is proposed that the programme will commence in 2004 session.

 

14. TARGET STUDENTS

Being that our programme is open and flexible, our target students fall within the wide category of   the Old, the Young, the Working Class, the Unemployed and even the retired public servants. Among the professionals and organised private or public sectors, we desire to have on in road into the military and para-military, police,

 

15. STUDENT ENROLMENT AND PROJECTION

We intend to start with about one thousand students nationwide at the initial stage. The moment the programme gains its expected popularity, we shall be having three to five thousand students annually.

 

15. CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, graduates of Political Science programme are qualified for full ranges of careers open to any social sciences or humanities students. The knowledge acquired will develop their high level of competence for critical thinking, building up their political instinct, widen their ability to understand and apply concepts in Political Science, evaluate, analyse issues.