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1.0    NAME OF THE PROGRAMME: M.SC Criminology and Security Studies

Programme Code:    XXXX

2.0    ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

To be admitted into the M.Sc. Criminology and Security Studies programme, a candidate is expected to have:

  1. A first degree with a minimum of Second Honours (lower division) in Sociology, Psychology, Criminology or Security studies from a recognized university or its equivalent.

or

  1. A Post Graduate Diploma in Criminology and Security Studies from NOUN or any recognized university.

 

Concession: Matured students of 35 years of age and above with 10 years work experience in Criminology and Security Studies related job position in addition to a first degree might be considered.

3.0       PHILOSOPHY, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

3.1 Programme Philosophy

The main philosophy of the postgraduate programmes in Criminology and Security Studies aspires to educate individuals with firm grasp of theories, concepts, and skills in the specialty which apply to finding solutions to real world national and global criminal and security challenges for the world that is safe and free from insecurity in order to promote development.

3.2 Vision

To provide functional, cost-effective, flexible learning which adds life- long value to quality of education for all who seek Knowledge in the field of criminology and security studies

    1. Aims

The M Sc. Criminology and Security Studies Programme aims at giving postgraduate students the opportunity to combine the intellectual adventure of contemplating some fundamental questions of order and control in contemporary societies with a strong sense of relevance to practical affairs. It therefore provides graduates with a sound basis from which to pursue a wide range of careers in security, criminal justice and a range of “transferable skills” that are highly valued in today’s labour market.

 

 

3.4 Specific Objectives

  • To produce the requisite manpower equipped with appropriate knowledge and skills to resolve criminal and security challenges in Nigeria, Africa and the global community.
  • To produce individuals who will contribute their quota to national and international development, applying their knowledge and skills to enhance better performance and output in police services, investigations, human rehabilitation services, and security management.
  • To raise crop of scientifically minded individuals who with their knowledge and skills of Criminology and Security Studies will become distinguished and sufficiently specialized in sub-specialties that will contribute to national and international development, peace, and security.
  1. PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND DEGREE RULES

4.1Outline of Programme Structure

The M.Sc. programme in Criminology and Security Studies is structured into a minimum of 4 semesters and a maximum of 8 semesters.

Year I

S/N

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

1st Semester

1.

CSS800

Theories in Criminology and Security I

3

C

2.

CSS802

Research Methods in Criminology and Security 1

3

C

3.

GST807

The Good Study Guide

2

C

4.

CIT 801

Foundation of information and Communication Technology

2

C

5.

CSS845

Types and Analysis of Security threats

3

E

6.

PCR 813

Peace and Security in a global context

3

E

7

CSS846

Legal and Social framework of Private Security in Nigeria

3

E

8

CSS847

Technical Aspects of Intelligence, Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism

3

E

 

 

Total Compulsory Credit Units

       10

 

 

 

Total Credit Units- Electives

        3

 

 

 

Total Credit Units

       13

 

2nd Semester

1.

CSS801

Theories in Criminology and Security II

3

C

2.

CSS872

Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria

3

C

3.

CSS848

Principles of Security Practice and Management

3

C

4.

CSS861

Restorative Justice, Victimization and Victim Assistance

3

E

5.

CSS852

Advanced Cyber Criminology and Vulnerability

3

E

 

CSS815

Personnel Security and Executive Protection

3

E

 

 

Total Compulsory Credit Units

9

 

 

 

Total Credit Units- Electives

3

 

 

 

Total Credit Units

12

 

Students must pass all Compulsory courses and a minimum of 3 credit units of Electives.

 

Year 2

S/N

Course Code

Course Title

Units

Status

 

1st Semester

1.

CSS803

Criminology and Security Report writing

3

C

 

2.

CSS834

Intelligence and National Security

3

C

 

3.

CSS804

Seminar in Theories in Criminology and Security Theory.

3

C

 

4.

CSS873

Seminar in Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria.

3

C

 

5.

CSS842

Policing and Law Enforcement in Nigeria.

3

E

 

6

CSS843

Military Intelligence: Strategic, Operational, and Tactical.

3

E

 

 

 

Total Compulsory Credit Units

12

 

 

 

 

Total Credit Units- Electives

3

 

 

 

 

Total Credit Units

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd Semester

1.

CSS874

Penology and Juvenile Justice.

3

C

 

2.

CSS844

Security Planning, Development and Organisation.

3

C

 

3.

CSS832

Research Project.

6

C

 

 

 

Total Compulsory Credit Units

12

 

 

 

 

Total Credit Units- Electives

-

 

 

 

 

Total Credit Units

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students must pass all Compulsory courses and a minimum of 3 credit units of Electives.

 

4.2 Degree Rules.

To graduation with an M.Sc. in Criminology and Security Studies, a student must take a minimum of 30 credit units including all compulsory courses not previously taken at the PGD level, and 6 credit units of elective courses for a 4 or 8 semester structure.

 

Summary of Distribution of Course Credits by Year

 

 

YEAR

GST and other General Courses

Core/ Compulsory

 

 

TOTAL

Criminology and Security Studies Courses

Elective

Year 1

4

17

6

27

Year 2

-

24

3

27

Total

4

41

9

54

 

NOTE:  Though the students are required to take a minimum of 30 Units they may widen their horizons of knowledge by taking a variety of the elective courses as their abilities would allow them.

    4.3 COURSE CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS

CSS 800:  Theories in Criminology and Security I & II (3 Credit units C)

This course introduces the definition of terms of criminology and its historical development. It goes further to explain various theoretical perspectives in criminology focusing on crime as individual phenomenon, with constitutional and biochemical factors, on the one hand, and on the other, crime as a social phenomenon. Also examined is a historical review of thought about crime and punishment with emphasis on the origin and evaluation of basic theories of crime-causation and community response as they arose in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Theoretical development of crime prevention, punishment, and treatment. Topics include historical models of crime control, growth of crime prevention, and aspects such as environmental design, community action programmes, and technology systems.

 

CSS 872:  Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria (3 Credit units C)

This course will examine and compare Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria and selected representative nations of the world. It goes further to discuss the theory and practice of juvenile justice, juvenile delinquency and processing of juvenile offenders, with special consideration for victims of crime, effects and consequences of victimization, women, crime and justice, women offenders, women victims and women as agents of criminal justice system. Juvenile delinquency, its form and causes would be examined. The administration of juvenile justice system: the juvenile court, the probation of young offenders, the remand home, the reformatory, the approved school and the portal systems would be presented and discussed. Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Child’s Rights Act (CRA) would be examined.

 

CSS 852: Cyber Criminology and Vulnerability (3 Credit units E)

Students discuss at length the reliability and vulnerability of computer-based technologies, biometrics, and security technologies. Included are case analyses of external (hacking) and internal (man-in-the-middle) attacks on government and private communications systems. Explores Entrepreneurship, Criminal Justice Systems – their modus operandi, strengths and weaknesses. Vulnerabilities of computer networks and techniques for protecting networks and data are discussed. Basic elements of symmetric and asymmetric cryptography, secure e-commerce, involving secure transmission, authentication, digital signatures, digital certificates and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) are presented. Provides students with an introduction to the field of information security risk assessment. Incorporates cases in risk analysis derived from actual state and law enforcement agencies or private firms. This course discusses telecommunications law and policy as it applies to the rapidly evolving technologies and capabilities of the internet, telecommunications, satellite and imagery systems available for commercial and government exploitation. The legal implications of a global internet, recourses available to law enforcement, treaties, etc. are reviewed from an international perspective including processes by which international cooperation is gained to deal with cyber threats.

 

CSS 861: Restorative Justice, Victimization and Victim Assistance (3 Credit units E)

An inquiry into the theories and research in restorative justice, as well as an assessment of victim assistance protocols and programmes. Examines restorative justice and victim assistance initiatives that provide an alternative framework for dealing with crime that places victim needs in a primary position, while addressing legal concerns and interagency differences. This course introduces students to the field of victimology and explores its conceptual boundaries, basic concepts and literature within various subareas. An analysis of the legal rights of victims of crime at state and federal levels as well as a review of how these laws relate to the treatment of victims within the criminal and juvenile justice systems, with particular focus on the courts and correctional institutions. Relevant legislative and Constitutional changes and challenges are also addressed.

 

CSS 802: Research Methods in Criminology and Security I&II (3 Credit units C)

This course introduces students to scientific research in criminology and further examines crime, criminal justice and scientific inquiry. It involves research design for criminological studies with an emphasis on data collection methods, measurement of validity and reliability, and causal analysis. It also explains the structure of criminal justice inquiry, research design, concept, operationalisation and measurement with validity and reliability. It finally discusses official and unofficial statistics with their limitations, etc and how to write the research report. Also examined is survey of advanced data analysis approaches used in criminological research. The course will generally cover problems of constructing indices and scales, procedures for analyzing limited dependent variable, structural equation models, models with latent variable and time series analysis. It is equally aimed at familiarizing students with the nature and utility of qualitative field work in various areas of criminological research. Also involved is research methods with application to intelligence, internal security, criminal justice, and other security-related interests. It also involves statistical methods with application to intelligence, internal security, criminal justice, and other security-related interests. This course formalizes key data that can be numerically represented in a way that permits useful analysis and application of the results.

 

Seminar in Theories in Criminology and Security (3 Credit Units C)

Students will be required to select topics on Theories in Criminology and Security that are relevant to their workplace environments. Each student will then present the topic for approval, write an abstract on the topic and then do an outline of the bibliography intended for the research.

 

These 3 activities will constitute the Tutor Marked Assignments (TMA) for the course. At the end of the semester, every student will present a term paper on the selected topic which will be graded as exam score. No other formal exam will be taken for this course.

 

Seminar in Theories in Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria (3 Credit Units C)

Students will be required to select topics on Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria that are relevant to their workplace environments. Each student will then present the topic for approval, write an abstract on the topic and then do an outline of the bibliography intended for the research.

 

These 3 activities will constitute the Tutor Marked Assignments (TMA) for the course. At the end of the semester, every student will present a term paper on the selected topic which will be graded as exam score. No other formal exam will be taken for this course.

 

CSS803: Criminology and Security Studies Report writing (3 Credit Units C)

Introduction - What intelligence gathering and reporting entails The Communication process and the context of intelligence gathering, recording and reporting. Basic principles of intelligence gathering, surveillance and prediction writing.  Types of intelligence e.g formal and informal etc.  Logic, Language and Style in intelligent report writing. Review and processing of selected criminal and security data, learners should be made to visit any relevant forensic laboratory and report in a spiral bonded writing of the intelligence experience at least 5 pages information to test the understanding of the different steps in criminal/security forensic investigation and data presentation.

 

CSS 842: Policing and Law Enforcement in Nigeria (3 Credit units E)

This course takes students through the history of the Nigeria police force, its Organization, pre-modern and modern policing, and specialized units. It also examines the role dilemma of    the police, professionalism, discretion and due process. It goes further to discuss the effects and   militarization on police operation, law enforcement procedure etc and the liability and responsibility of members of the police force. Everyone understands the need for “Internal Security,” but few know the precise definition. In fact, the government itself has changed the definition every few years since 2001. Very few law enforcement professionals appreciate the complexity of the internal security mission, nor understand the need for intelligence support for that mission. This course covers in detail how the intelligence enterprise supports our internal security and law enforcement programmes. Using the accepted internal security paradigm-prevent, protect, mitigate, respond, and recover, it describes the current state of “security intelligence” and explains how that discipline relates to our national security. An analysis of crime, delinquency, and victimization within various demographic and ecological systems of society. The course will focus on characteristics of offenders and offences. A social psychological examination of current issues and problems in municipal law enforcement, including such topics as the informal exercise of police authority, police role conflict, the relative significance of law enforcement and social service, and interactional dynamics of police subculture.

CSS 874: Penology and Juvenile Justice (3 Credit units E)

A survey of approaches to corrections, correctional institutions, their residents, programmes and management, and special problems such as probation and parole, riots, outside contacts, and special institutions. This course introduces students to the history and evolution of prisons and the correctional environment. It examines the philosophy and aims of punishment in the development of penal policy. It goes further to explain the differences in correctional and post correctional system, treatment model as against justice ‘model’ the role and consequences of imprisonment, prison policies and future of Nigerian prisons. Juvenile delinquency, its form and causes would be examined. The administration of juvenile justice system: the juvenile court, the probation of young offenders, the remand home, the reformatory, the approved school and the portal systems would be presented and discussed. Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Child’s Rights Act (CRA) would be examined. This course considers the processing of offenders through the juvenile justice system. It investigates the special forms of justice applied to non-adults by arrest, detention, adjudication and juvenile corrections. It also focuses on the key issues that arise when attempting to deal with drug use, particularly in juvenile and criminal justice contexts. The course takes a multi-disciplinary approach as it focuses on strategies of demand reduction and not simply strategies of reducing the supply of substances. This course considers the processing of offenders through the juvenile justice system. It investigates the special forms of justice applied to non-adults by arrest, detention, adjudication and juvenile corrections.

 

CSS 848: Principles of Security Practice and Management (3 Credit units E)

This course describes security principles and practical application of these principles. It goes further to highlight management and organizational principles with special consideration for security audits, surveys, policies and procedures, budgeting and fiscal management, security and the law, security personnel and security situations for effective managements. Looks in detail at the nature, scale and extent of surveillance in modern societies. In particular it explores the way in which surveillance technologies are being used by governments and private organizations, their impact upon theories of social control and security, and the protection of civil liberties and human rights. The criminal justice system is based upon substantive and procedural criminal law. It is also a system of rights. This class considers the definitions and development of criminal law, criminal procedure and criminal rights, with special attention to constitutional theory and practice.

 

CSS 844: Security Planning, Development and Organisation (3 Credit units E)

This course explains the establishment of a security department through strategic planning with the use of a manpower plan. It goes further to discuss budget consideration, staff selection criteria and programme development;  it discusses how to screen and interview candidate, the purpose of training and the importance of standard codes of practice and discipline, personnel matters and uniform regulation. This course examines the role of courts in determining social policy as it relates to criminology and national security. Emphasis is directed toward the political and social inputs that influence judicial decision making and the role of democracy and punishment in the courts. These topics are examined using current social policy. The course satisfies oral competency requirements.  

 

CSS 845: Types and Analysis of Security threats (3 Credit units E)

This course introduces security threat such as terrorism; cyber terrorism, biological, chemical and radiological attacks, kidnap and hostage taking, bomb threats, armed robbery attack, assassination, hijack (land, air, and sea) environmental pollution, strikes demonstration and mob action. It goes further to examine various methods of analyzing this threat for prevention and control. These methods include crime analysis, vulnerability analysis, risk analysis, basic impact analysis etc. This course explores a wide range of questions in order to provide students with a deeper understanding of the origins and evolution of modern terrorism, and the intelligence challenges posed by terrorist groups to states with an emphasis on Nigeria. The course is divided into three parts. Part 1 examines the nature, objectives, strategies, and organization of terrorism and terrorist groups. It also addresses the political, psychological, socioeconomic, and religious causes of terrorist violence. Part 2 consists of student presentations on active terrorist organizations. Part 3 focuses on counterterrorism and the challenges of collecting intelligence against terrorist organizations. Based on recent Nigerian experience in combating terrorism, the course will introduce students to the strengths and weaknesses of counterterrorist tools, domestic and international intelligence requirements and collection strategies, and the need to balance civil liberties and security.             

 

CSS 846: Legal and Social framework of Private Security in Nigeria (3 Credit units E)

This course describes varying character and different perspectives of the private security industry and its activities, and the problems connected with the governance of the sector. It examines the multi-faceted implications and problem of the use of the different services provided by these private actors. It also explores the advantages and disadvantages of privatization and commercialization induced by the outsourcing of the state’s monopoly over the use of violence for the provision of public good of security and order, and the problems states incur by the use of contracted security services for both direct control and indirect control over force and the bases of their authority. It also illustrate the legal, policy, governance, and oversight issues that private contracting raise, since the private security is still largely unregulated.      

 

CSS 815:  Personnel Security and Executive Protection (3 Credit units E)

This course introduces students to the personal protection specialist and his background characteristics and traits, why there is need for executive protection and where the threat comes from. It also exposes students to who the targets are how crisis management and in –house security teams complement each other, how to draw up a plan and carry out surveys for surveillance and counter surveillance operation with the use of technical surveillance measures as protection equipment, the use of force and close quarter combat to protect the principal

 

CSS 847: Technical Aspects of Intelligence, Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (3 Credit units E)

This course introduces intrusion detection systems such as alarms, sensors, motion detectors, etc. and close circuit television systems. It goes further to discuss access control and identification systems, including a two way communication system with clocking devises for guard tour systems and security operations management, it goes further to explain fire protection and suppression including automation. Considers collective methods used to fill gaps in intelligence, as well as the potential impacts of future collection systems and their ability to satisfy intelligence requirements. Also covers: the full spectrum of the intelligence collection cycle; intelligence needs in future collection planning; and advanced methods of collecting data to support intelligence community consumers. Students will be exposed to Counterintelligence, Denial and Deception, Applied Source Collection, Human Intelligence, Interrogation, Cyber warfare, Tactical Intelligence, Signals, Intelligence & Security, and Human Rights.  It equally explores the emergence and manifestation of terror and terrorism from a range of historical, political, sociological, and cultural perspectives. Emphasizing the diverse and contested nature of terror as both concept and practice, a number of case studies are highlighted in order to explore the complex connections between order, power, authority, security and terror.

 

CSS 834: Intelligence and National Security (3 Credit units E)

The integration of the National Intelligence Community, and the complexities this integration brings, will be analyzed. This course covers the intelligence cycle (Planning and direction, collection, processing, analysis, and dissemination). It also covers key aspects of intelligence such as warning and surprise; denial and deception; covert action; oversight and civil liberties; role of policymakers; and intelligence reform. Students will evaluate how changes in the national intelligence community are meeting the objectives of the war on terrorism and contributing to more effective intelligence. Evaluates leading terrorist organizations and their agendas, as well as the causes of and threats from domestic and international terrorism. Explores information sharing limits under the Nigeria’s Cybercrime Act and Anti-Terrorism Act. Teaches how to identify the leading terrorist organizations, understand their agendas, and develop the critical thinking skills and methodological techniques to defeat them. Students will be exposed to Terrorism and Nigeria’s National Security, Intelligence Analysis, Cyber Warfare, Intelligence and Narcotics, Terrorism and Counterterrorism, Illicit Finance, Criminal Intelligence Analysis, Global Terrorism, and Psychology of Terrorism.

 

CSS 843: Military Intelligence: Strategic, Operational, and Tactical (3 Credit units E)

If war is in fact the extension of politics by other means, this course aims to understand how and why states use force in pursuit of their national interests. Class studies classical theories of warfare, including Clausewitz and Sun Tzu. Case studies in warfare from 19th and 20th centuries develop a model of how states have traditionally used war and supporting intelligence to accomplish policy aims at strategic, operational, and tactical levels. Technological and political shifts of the last decade are explored to determine what they imply about how sates can and will use force in the future as part of their national security policies. Course reviews how intelligence supports each level of warfare and how intelligence failures affect strategic outcomes. Over the last ten years, special operations forces have become a core element in America’s response to trans-national terrorism. These units have trained and advised foreign military and paramilitary forces; captured or killed thousands of Al Qaeda and Taliban commanders and foot soldiers; and conducted a variety of operations around the globe. This course will focus on the ways in which special operations forces have been incorporated into national security strategy and policy. Through the use of a series of case studies, students will investigate the differences between special operations forces and other elite units; scrutinize the roles and missions of these organizations; understand their unique intelligence support requirements at tactical, operational, and strategic levels; consider the influence of popular culture; and probe the impact of bureaucratic politics and organizational culture between the special operations community and international allies, Congress, the interagency community, and conventional military forces.

 

CSS 832: Thesis (6 Credit units C)

The project is a substantial piece of work ‘Long Essay’ and is written under individual supervision on a subject of your choice within your degree specialization

 4.4    Course Development

Course development is an integral part of Instructional design within the Open and Distance learning system. All the courses in this programme have been designed and developed in line with an approved curriculum to meet the educational needs of the target group. The course content is written by experts in the field of Journalism and Mass Communication to achieve specific learning objectives. Each study material consists of identified topics that make up the course outline. Study units are developed and written addressing these topics together with exercises which students can attempt to evaluate themselves, and tutor marked assignments which students will complete and submit for assessment. The study materials are passed through several editing processes to ensure quality both in content and language.

  1. LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION

All the courses under this Programme will be taught using English Language as the medium of instruction/communication.

6.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE

High level of quality assurance is maintained for all our courses. We ensure Total Quality Management (TQM) for all our programmes through qualitative method of admission. We have a comprehensive and rigorous method of course material development which gives room for the selection and appointment of best candidates for the development and writing of the programme course materials. We ensure that only qualified candidates are employed as staff as well as facilitators in order to give our students the best service required, while regular adequate monitoring and supervision of our study centres are embarked upon in order to see to the smooth running of the Tutorials, Tutor- Marked Assignments and Examinations respectively.

6.1 Staff list

Residence Staff:

 

S/N

Name

Institution

Contact

Rank

Qualification

Status

1

Prof. Sam O. Smah

NOUN

08037000860

Prof.

Ph.D.

F/T

2

Dr. A. T. Adegoke

NOUN

08084942571

SL

Ph.D.

F/T

3

Dickson O. Igwe

NOUN

08058989545

LI

Ph.D.

F/T

4

Chukwunka CAC

NOUN

08085195303

LII

M.Sc.

F/T

5

Ebobo C.Urowole

NOUN

08063090293

LII

M.Sc.

F/T

6

Dr. Oyebode O

NOUN

08033283013

LI

Ph.D.

F/T

7

Dr. Nwaocha Vivian

NOUN

 

LI

Ph.D.

F/T

8

Dr. Ojo Mathew

NOUN

08055915018

LI

Ph.D.

F/T

 

Apart from the above officers that are directing the affairs of the Programme at the Department, we also have about thirty-seven facilitators at various study centres all over the country.

 

List of Facilitators

 

S/N

Name

Institution

Contact

Rank

Qualification

Status

1

Prof. Godswill James

 

 

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

2

Prof. Femi Odekunle

 

08037033421

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

3

Prof. E. E. Alemika

unijos

08037040435

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

4

Prof. Yusuf Hauwau E.

katsu

08034466588

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

5

Prof. Adoyi Onoja

NSU

08065719330

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

6

Prof. J. B. Inyang

unical

08064016880

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

7

Prof. Darlington I.

uniport

08160599872

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

8

Prof. Ozo- Eson

uinabuja

08037007478

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

9

Prof. C. U. Ugwuoke

unn

08036853482

Prof

Ph.D.

 

P/T

10

Prof. Omololu Soyombo

unilag

08033117430

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

11

Prof. Magareth Bahal

uniabuja

08133138783

Prof.

Ph.D.

 

P/T

12

Prof. Edyflyod E. Igbo

lapai

08127156730

Prof.

Ph.D.

 

P/T

13

Prof. A.A. Aderinto 

ui

08032210505

 

Prof.

Ph.D.

P/T

14

Dr. Ato, Franca

unilag

08023107727

Reader

Ph.D.

P/T

15

Dr. Smart E Otu

funai

08060140365

Read

Ph.D.

P/T

16

Dr. Chioma D. O.

uniport

08033427372

SL

Ph.D.

P/T

17

Dr. Daniel Ikuomola

osu

 

SL

Ph.D.

P/T

18

Dr. Austin Ogugua

unilag

08033326802

SL

Ph.D

P/T

19

Dr Adedeji

Oyenuga

 

lasu

 

08037269268

SL

Ph.D.

 

P/T

20

Dr. Ojoma Benedict

 

 

SL

Ph.D

P/T

21

Dr. Angela A. A.

 

 

 

 

SL

Ph.D

 

P/T

22

DR. Musa Gwoza

unimed

 

08034664122

SL

Ph.D

 

P/T

23

Dr. Onipede, W.

 

 

 

SL

Ph.D.

P/T

24

Dr. Lawal A.

 

 

 

SL

Ph.D

 

P/T

26

Dr. Odoma, S U.

 

08051313108

SL

Ph.D 

 

P/T

27

Dr. Dagaci Aliyu M.

 

 

SL

Ph.D

P/T

28

Omobowale, A. O.

 

08053607449

SL

Ph.D

P/T

29

Okorie Ebere J.

 

08036751264

SL

Ph.D

P/T

30

Okeshola, B. F.

 

08036499929

SL

Ph.D

P/T

31

Lawal Adamu A.

 

08106422444

SL

Ph.D

P/T

32

Lagi Daniel T.

 

08036042488

SL

Ph.D

P/T

33

Usman A. Korofi

 

08092566605

SL

Ph.D

P/T

34

Dr. Musa A.

 

08123827672

SL

Ph.D

P/T

35

Dukku, A. M

 

07033042943

SL

Ph.D

P/T

36

Dr. Bashir M. U.

 

08066695504

SL

Ph.D

P/T

37

Anyanabia,  A.

 

08037065837

SL

Ph.D

P/T

38

Ngwoke Cyril O.

 

08037320470

SL

Ph.D

P/T

39

Obrifor, C. A.

 

08037075432

SL

Ph.D

P/T

40

Uthman A. A.

 

08037616096

SL

Ph.D

P/T

41

Bello Ibrahim

 

08037020907

SL

Ph.D

P/T

42

Mohammed, I.

 

08037043283

SL

Ph.D

P/T

43

Ojedokun, U. A.

 

08066982678

SL

Ph.D

P/T

44

Ngwu Leonard

 

08029632720

SL

Ph.D

P/T

45

Mgbekemdi E. H.

 

08037722582

SL

Ph.D

P/T

46

Alatise Remi K.

 

08037203458

SL

Ph.D

P/T

47

Omoniyi, O.

 

 

SL

Ph.D

P/T

48

Onayemi, O. M.

 

08074840519

SL

Ph.D

P/T

49

Emeka C. I.

 

08067037617

SL

Ph.D

P/T

50

DR Nneka O.

 

08026201764

LI

Ph.D.

P/T

51

DR. Ndubueze, P.

 

 

08030964383

LI

Ph.D.

 

P/T

52

Dr. B. Nwokeoma

 

 

08037089645

LI

Ph.D.

 

P/T

53

Dr John Ogunwale

 

 

LI

Ph.D.

P/T

54

Dr. Amaechi Nzekwe

 

 

LI

Ph.D.

P/T

55

Dr. Ngwu Leonard

 

 

LI

Ph.D.

P/T

56

Dr. Olabisi Yusuf

 

 

 

LI

Ph.D

 

P/T

57

Dr. Johnson Ayodele

 

 

 

LI

Ph.D.

P/T

58

Dr. Halilu Babaji

 

 

 

LI

Ph.D.

P/T

59

Dr. Yusuf Ibrahim Gamawa

 

 

 

 

 

LII

Ph.D.

 

P/T

60

Dr. Musa Adamu Wunti

 

 

 

LII

Ph.D

 

P/T

61

Dr.Akintoye, Obaide Emily

 

 

 

 

LII

Ph.D.

 

P/T

62

Dr.Iduemre, Ochuko

 

 

LII

Ph.D

P/T

63

Dr. Odia, L. Osaretin

 

 

LII

Ph.D.

P/T

 

Apart from the above officers that are directing the affairs of the Programme at the Headquarters, we also have about thirty-seven facilitators at our various study centres all over the country.

6.2 Admission and Registration Procedure

Admission and Registration Procedures are On-Line Based. Students are required to purchase Admission Form from any of the NOUN Recognised Banks and then fill the form and submit On-Line. Admission lists of successful candidates are published on NOUN Web-Site while the admission letters are dispatched to the nearest study centers. Students are also expected to complete their registration procedure On-Line.

6.3 Instructional Methods and Delivery

Instructional method is online and by facilitation. High quality printed course materials are distributed to students during registration. They read at their convenient time while face to face facilitation for each and every course is carried out by qualified facilitators at is various designated study’s centers all over the country. Soft Copies of all the course materials are also available.

6.4 Evaluation

6.4.1 Tutor Marked Assignment

Continuous assessments are carried out in the form of assignments and are based on the study material for each course. These assignments will constitute 30% of the total score. The pass mark for the continuous assessment is 50% of the total score.

 

 

6.4.2 End of Semester Examination

Except otherwise stated, each course will culminate in an end of semester examination. The examination constitutes 70% of the total score. The pass mark for the final examination is 50% of the total score.

 

6.4.3 Marking of Examination Scripts

Examination Scripts are marked by tutorial facilitators within their specified areas of specialization. Immediately after the Examinations, all scripts are brought to the Examination and Evaluation Directorate at the Headquarters. It is at this Directorate, in collaboration with the faculty concerned that marking of student script is done.

 

6.5 Learners’ Supports

On realizing the importance of Learners Support to our programmes and to our students, there exists a Learners Support directorate in the University that is in charge of the Students’ Academic Welfare.

 

  1. RECOGNITION OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme has been prepared in line with international standards.

  1. PROGRAMME STARTING DATE AND PRESENTATION SCHEDULE

Following the approval of Senate, the programme commenced 2004/2005 academic session.

  1. TARGET GROUP

The programme should be of immense interest and benefit to professionals within various media organisations who desire to upgrade their qualifications, to those whose desire to pursue teaching and research careers as well as those who desire to transit from other disciplines into the field of Journalism.

  1. STUDENT PROJECTIONS

Based on the figures for first set of admissions (124), the programme is projected to have an estimated student population of 250 annually for the first three years and is expected to increase to 500 annually thereafter.

  1. CONCLUSION

Capacity building in the communication industry is of immense importance particularly for an emerging economy and democracy as is the case in Nigeria. As a pluralistic society, Nigeria requires balanced reporting to avoid heating up the polity. As such, the key objective of the programme which is the integration of theory and application will enhance the quality of Journalistic practice in the midst of a diversity of ideas and culture. It will also help practitioners to keep abreast of current global trends in the communication industry.